Linux Standard Kernel 3.3 released, Android trappings in tow | webOS Nation
 
 

Linux Standard Kernel 3.3 released, Android trappings in tow 13

by Derek Kessler Mon, 19 Mar 2012 8:01 pm EDT

Linux Standard Kernel 3.3 released, Android trapping in towRight on schedule (for taking place in the month of March, that is), the Linux Standard Kernel version 3.3 has been released, bringing a metric ton of Android driver support to the mix. While the release itself isn't all that exciting, what HP, homebrewers, and device manufacturers will be able to do with it is another thing entirely.

As we previously reported, the inclusion of Android driver support in the kernel means that software using it will be more easily installed and operated on a wide range of hardware - including Android smartphones and tablets. Of course, you wouldn't just be able to throw raw webOS with the Linux Standard Kernel onto a Droid RAZR and expect it to work right without a hitch - there are buttons and radios and the like that the kernels doesn't cover. It is possible that HP and the open source community could put the work into making even greater universal hardware support happen, but we can see that as being a lot of work.

There's also some work to be done with the Linux Standard Kernel itself. As version 3.3 there are still some unresolved problems regarding power management and a wake-lock issue that we hope to see resolved in version 3.4. That said, the Linux Standard Kernel is just a part of the Open webOS plan. A pretty integral part to the plan to deploy everywhere, but one of many parts nonetheless. There's plenty of work to be done on top of the kernel to make webOS happen. That's work that's been ongoing, with the already discussed Nyx hardware abstraction layer, Isis and QtWebKit, the open sourcing of the Enyo 2.0 application framework. There's more to come for Open webOS this month - including LevelDB and Novacom drivers - and for many months to come.

Source: Android Central

13 Comments

The "unresolved problems" aren't with Linus's kernel tree, they're with Google. Linux power management works pretty damn well. The issue is that Android was riddled with "Not Invented Here" development. Yes, it was open-source, but it was all done separately from mainline (GNU/) Linux development.

True about what is open and whats not on android. Have to say though seeing What would be WebOS in ICS kinda makes me smile a little.:)

what I'm always concern is about the gesture area. I really hope new hardware will come with that unique webOS feature.

from what i have been told from the makers of open mobile, it will be.

Hey Teckie,

Have you heard from Open Mobile lately? Are you a beta tester?

i was informed I might become one.. but each day I check the mail box.. no luck :(makes me quite sad! ;)

I think what Open OS should include is a virtual gesture area.. like what earlier Palm OS had for the graffitti. This should be enabled for devices with or without keyboard, so it would be usable on any hardware - whether slab etc. Furthermore the space maybe should be a 'fixed' virtual gesture area so that it does not impede the design for the visual space of the device.

I think what Open OS should include is a virtual gesture area.. like what earlier Palm OS had for the graffitti. This should be enabled for devices with or without keyboard, so it would be usable on any hardware - whether slab etc. Furthermore the space maybe should be a 'fixed' virtual gesture area so that it does not impede the design for the visual space of the device.

Actualy, daexpression, I would suggest that webOS needs to move beyond the need for a gesture area, and re-work the gesture concept to be able to function without a dedicated gesture space in the hardware. Still USE gestures, but instead of a gesture area, simply use gestures over the entire surface of the device to manipulate it.

Think about it: is there any reason why we couldn't use "half-screen swipe left" as a "back" gesture and "full screen swipe left or right" for "swap to card to the left or right"? As long as the gestures are used consistently, there should be a way to set it up so that we don't NEED a gesture area to have the same functionality with minimal to no muscle memory retraining.

The gestures and the way webOS uses them are one of the fantastic things about it. now we just need to make it work on any device with a touchscreen, and we are GOLDEN.

The problem with lack of a dedicate gesture area, is determining how to make a distinction between a system space gesture vs an application space gesture, especially if they can use the same motions, same fingers, and same surface.

"why we couldn't use "half-screen swipe left" as a "back" gesture and "full screen swipe left or right" for "swap to card to the left or right"?"

Now you can't use those obvious and basic gestures at all in your application. It gets too ambiguous and when the OS starts interpreting your application level gesture to be a system gestures, and vice versa--the user experience is going to suffer.

"Move this box from the right side of the screen to the left side" is going to result in a full screen swipe that is then interpreted as a "switch cards" at the OS level, etc.

Maybe the key is something like 3 or 4 finger swipes mean it's system level gesture, and less than that, is application? But then you still limit what gestures app developers can support. Maybe my app needs 10 finger gestures, for whatever odd reason...

If we stick with a gesture area, then another question is where to put it? Especially given the lack of a bezel on future hardware. Anyone who thinks tablets are going to keep being cranked out with a inch wide bezel around the screen are kidding themselves. Like that touchpad 2.0 concept we saw, the bezel is going shrink, and then go away. We'll be seeing altogether edgeless screens on tablets at some point. It's undeniable.

That means the gesture area (if that route is taken) has to be a section of the display that's cordoned off from the main viewing area via the OS. I think the gesture area could probably be somehow combined with the launcher bar. It should be highly customizeable, themeable, and animated. Instead of an animated LED bar like on the PRE, we should see a fully illustrated animated piece of HTML5 sitting there.

I want to see something like a treebranch, and when I as I swipe along it, the leaves and flowers bud and it comes alive for second. Or I want to see Nyan cat fly across the area. Or a fishtank, and then the little fishies swim across in the path of my gesture. It just needs to allow people to be creative with it, in they kinds of ways I see happening with Android's animated backgrounds.

Right now on the iPad, I can easily switch between apps with a multifinger left/right swipe. I can bring up the multitasking bar with a multifinger swipe up. I can reveal the homescreen with a multifinger pinch. Those gestures work great and don't interfere with in-app gestures. There are also many great in-app and system gestures on the Mac.

There is little reason for any other tablet NOT to support both in-app and system gestures.

So maybe multi-finger gestures are indeed the way to go.

"There is little reason for any other tablet NOT to support both in-app and system gestures."

For sure, I just meant that by assigning specific gestures to the system, you eliminate those specific gestures from use in your application. That might end up somehow being limiting to certain application concepts.

That might end up somehow being limiting to certain application concepts.

Indeed. But that problem exists with a gesture area as well. For example, a full swipe left or right on the gesture area of the Pre results in app switching (if turned on). This means an app could not make use of this particular gesture. An app could, however respond to the back gesture. So you still wind up with gestures reserved for the system vs those that can be acted upon by an app.

i believe the Galaxy Nexus with ICS has the virtual "buttons" for the back, home and task switcher, that area could be used as the gesture area..so since alot of people love some of the hardware put out by Manufactures and ICS will be on all future devices soon...this could work in webOS favor for a dedicated gesture area ..BAM!!!! :)