Tabbed card stacks, infinite card view, and additional keyboard layouts happening thanks to webOS Community Edition | webOS Nation
 
 

Tabbed card stacks, infinite card view, and additional keyboard layouts happening thanks to webOS Community Edition

by Derek Kessler Sun, 01 Jul 2012 11:15 am EDT

On Thursday we talked about one of the first projects to come out of the webOS Community Edition. The newly-open-sourced code for major chunks of webOS 3.0.5 had within two days brought us the fast card switching gestures that we'd been pining for for far too long. But with access to parts like the LunaSysMgr, what else the homebrew community would come up with was a huge and excitingly open question.
Well, here are some more answers. Coming from the mind and keyboard of Andrew Holbrook (dukiedrew) is something we're actually quite impressed by: tabbed card stacks. With this modification, a simple swipe in from the left side when in an app of the screen scoots your current view to the side a bit to load a vertical column of the thumbnails of the other app cards in that card stack. Tap on one of the thumbnails and it and your current app swap places. Swipe back to the left to dismiss the thumbnails column and get back to your app.

Holbrook's work isn't limited to just card stack tabs - he's also worked up how to cycle the webOS card spread around the ends so you can keep swiping past the end of your cards and jump to the far end of your open apps. If you've got a lot open, this could be an easy way to navigate everything. Video of the infinite card view and tabbed card stacks is above.

After the break is another video, this one from Måns Andersson. As a Swede, there's not a lot of support for his preferred keyboard layouts built into webOS. Again playing with LunaSysMgr, Andersson was able to add additional layouts for Dvorak, Swedish Dvorak, and Swedish QWERTY to the standard international webOS keyboard layouts, including a button on the Swedish keyboards to quickly switch between Dvorak and QWERTY.

All of this work was completed thanks to the webOS Community Edition and the quick work of WebOS Internals' WebOS Ports team. It's all open source, and all done free-of-charge for you. We wouldn't discourage you from sending a donation the way of WebOS Internals - without your support they can't pay for servers and test devices and the like, and this kind of awesome stuff becomes that much more difficult to do.