App Preview: FlashCards HD | webOS Nation
 
 

App Preview: FlashCards HD

by Tim Stiffler-Dean Sun, 07 Aug 2011 5:13 pm EDT

James Harris is one of those webOS developers that seems to always pump out apps that immediately rocket to the top of many of our "must-have" lists. He's worked in conjunction with a large company to bring WhitePages to all webOS devices, works closely with many devs in launching their apps, brought us the famed Free Music Ringtones of old and is now getting ready to update one of his first webOS apps, FlashCards (which does more than just help you study), so that it runs natively on the big screen. Luckily for us, James has given us an exclusive preview of his app to share with you, so skip the break below to see some screenshots and get a look at what's coming next for FlashCards HD.

While James was quick to remind us several times while we were poking around that the app is still in a beta-preview form, we can't help but oggle over how well it has been built. Looking at the screenshots you'll notice that the layout is very similar to the smartphone version of the same app, but with a few significant changes. Not only will the big red button in the top right corner completely disrupt the entire experience that you have within the app, but every object in the main screen (and nearly every scene after) does some very unique task quite well. The careful fading in and out of the dialogue boxes and content adds a really nice touch to the design, and of course, we can't discredit the extreme depth that the content goes into as well.

The main purpose of the app, as you might have guess from the title of it, is to give students and curious learners the ability to quiz themselves using the FlashCard sets that they've either created themselves or downloaded from the very large (and growing) database that FlashCards HD hooks into. A new feature, "Flash Me!", will even use webOS notifications to randomly give the student a question to answer (based on the idea that you'll learn more if you're thinking about the content regularly and not just during rushed study-sessions). Navigating through the cards and sets that you've downloaded is natural and uses webOS 3.0 panels to keep the categories and content separated. Once you've launched a flashcard set, you just tap through to see answers to each question and work your way through the entire set.

There is a whole lot more that we've yet to explore with this first preview of FlashCards HD, but with it being a beta app we expect great things from a finalized version. Keep your eyes open here in the future for an update on when the app is officially released and when we can give it a proper review. Until then, oggle at the screenshots above and below and leave a comment for James to see what you think about the app. If you want to get a taste of the app now, download FlashCards for your webOS smartphone in the app catalog. It's worth it, too - James will be making FlashCards HD a free upgrade to everyone who's already bought the phone version.