webOS Nation | webOS Forums, News, Reviews, Apps and Help
 
 

Articles

6 years ago

This is my webOS [from the forums]

This is my webOS [from the forums]

by Derek Kessler Sun, 27 Jan 2013 8:12 pm EST

This is my webOS [from the forums]

Despite it having been well over a year since the last update to webOS, my TouchPad and Pre3 are the constant recipients of updates thanks to the webOS homebrew community. These updates are typically smaller than a system upgrade, with the homebrew community engaging in smaller piecemeal improvements, though there are larger package upgrades like LunaCE from WebOS Ports and the Advanced System patches by Sconix. I personally swap out my patches on a fairly regular basis; there are a couple of configurations that serve me well, but I like to keep things fresh. There might be a small part of me that interprets regularly changing up the way my webOS devices operate as a refresh of sorts, standing in for the formal update these devices will never receive.

Garrett92C started a thread that caught our attention in the webOS Nation Forums with a clever title and concept: This is my webOS. In it he offers up what his personal customizations to webOS look like on his device (including a llama), and asks others to do the same. With more than hundreds of patches and themes available for webOS devices, chances are you could customize your Pre or TouchPad to be entirely unique, not to mention looking and operating exactly how you'd like it to.

My current set-up is as follows. My TouchPad is running the last version of LunaCE, and that's the only customization I've made to it. I used to have a dozen or so patches installed, but after having to doctor early on in the LunaCE alpha process I never got around to reinstalling those patches. And frankly, it's working just fine without them. LunaCE offers up a number of improvements that I don't think I could do without. These patches, somehow, I seem to be living without. At least for now - my homebrew binges tend to come on without warning.

My Pre3, on the other hand, is heavily customized. In addition to the UI Scale patch you see in action above, I'm running with the almost the complete suite of Sconix's Advance System patches (Behavior, Menu Prefs Framework, Calendar Prefs, Email Prefs, Phone Prefs, and System Prefs), Jason Robitaille's Advanced Reset Options and Device Menu Megamix, Hold Tap Context Menu for both Email and Web, Custom Carrier String, Character Counter, and Sharing Super Mix.

There's also a slew of patches meant to just make webOS run more smoothly (Increase Touch Sensitivity and Smoothness, Mojo FPS Booster, Mojo Smooth Scrolling, Muffle System Logging, and Unthrottle Download Manager); I'm not sure what impact they're all having, but combined they make my Pre3 generally buttery smooth. Really rounding out the buttery smoothness though is UberKernel, which though having not been updated in a year is still a great improvement in performance and battery life for the Pre3, especially when coupled with Govnah for personalizing how it behaves.

So that's what my webOS looks like. I'm sure yours looks different, my tastes and needs are no doubt different than yours. Go ahead and head to the forums and share your webOS; you've put the work into customizing it the way you want, might as well show of your configuration.

6 years ago

One year of Open webOS

One year of Open webOS

by Derek Kessler Fri, 25 Jan 2013 5:18 pm EST

Open webOS on the Samsung Galaxy Nexus

One year ago today we got our first look at how HP's open source strategy for webOS was going to play out. We got the roadmap.

The first several months of this roadmap were admittedly pretty dull. Enyo 1.0 was immediately open sourced, followed soon thereafter with the gradual release of the new Enyo 2.0 directly to open source. When it comes to the roadmap, Enyo 2.0 and its web-based app builder Ares 2.0 are the only things that didn't fell off schedule (for obvious reasons). Everything else came out as planned, in a slow and methodical fashion.

Over the course of seven months the webOS team at HP cleansed the code of webOS of proprietary third-party and licensed material. They scoured through 450,000 lines of code in fifty-four separate components, ensuring they were all up-to-snuff for the open source release. Along the way they committed a number of improvements, including utilizing the Linux Standard Kernel, updated WebKit with a new browser, a hardware abstraction layer, and much more.

The first beta for the rechristened Open webOS 1.0 landed at the end of August 2012, bringing with it two separate versions: one to be run as an app inside Ubuntu Linux, and another utilizing OpenEmbedded software to allow it to run on a wide variety of ARM-powered devices. The Ubuntu version was fun to play with, but really only useful for developers, and the OpenEmbedded version came lacking an user interface. It wasn't until the end of September that the full 1.0 release came, bringing along a user interface for those of us that are into such things in our modern operating systems.

Along the way, HP surprised us with a separate release. In March of 2012 HP announced that they were open sourcing the system manager - LunaSysMgr - for webOS 3.0.5. The release of this "webOS Community Edition" came in July and allowed the homebrew community to tackle improving webOS on the TouchPad head-on, and improve they did. The newly-formed WebOS Ports (not to be confused with, even though affiliated with, WebOS Internals) jumped head-first into the endeavor, quickly iterating a number of fixes and improvements and releasing it as LunaCE. Among the additions: resizable cards, gesture-based app switching, cursor placement of any sort, and more.

read more...
Category:
6 years ago

Enable Tabbed Cards (LunaCE)

Enable Tabbed Cards (LunaCE)

by Adam Marks Fri, 25 Jan 2013 4:17 pm EST

This tip is only for HP TouchPads running webOS 3.0.5 and LunaCE 4.9.5 or higher

Tweaks - Tabbed LunaCE browsingWhen HP released their Open Source "webOS Community Edition" for the HP TouchPad (not to be confused with Open webOS), the group at WebOS Ports was able to package up those changes along with a bunch of enhancements and released it as LunaCE (pronounced lunacy") in Preware. LunaCE is currently in beta so you will need to go through the process to set-up the beta feeds in Preware, which can be found at testing.preware.org. In addition, you will need to have Tweaks installed on your TouchPad to toggle any of the new enhancements.

One of those aforementioned enhancements is the ability to use Tabbed Cards. While webOS 1.0 introduced the multitasking "card" metaphor and webOS 2.0 expanded that to allow for stacking of cards, LunaCE further redefined it by allowing quick access to switching between stacked applications using tabs along the side of the screen. Once you go into Luna section in Tweaks and toggle the "TABBED CARDS" option, all you need to do is swipe in the from either side of screen and your current application will shift over a little to expose a mini-view of all the other apps that are in that same stack.  Tapping on one of those mini cards will cause that app to be put in focus. Once you get the app you want in focus, tap on it and the mini tabbed cards will disappear.

Technically, you can perform the same action by swiping up to go into card mode and then tapping on the card in the stack that you want. However, this tabbed method gives you a little clearer view of all the apps in the stack and you can cycle through all the apps in the stack without having to go back into card mode each time. 

However, there are a few things that you should be aware of when using tabbed cards:

  • Every time you tap on a tabbed card, you swap the actual location within the stack of the current apps and that one you selected. Therefore, when you do go back to card mode and see your stack, the order of the cards will have changed
  • If there is only one app in a stack, swiping in the from the side of the screen will not perform any action.
  • If there are more than four apps in the stack, you can scroll through the tabs by swiping up or down through the tabs.
6 years ago

Steve Jobs threatened Palm with a patent lawsuit should employee poaching continue

Steve Jobs threatened Palm with a patent lawsuit should employee poaching continue

by Derek Kessler Wed, 23 Jan 2013 7:23 pm EST

Steve Jobs threatened Palm with a patent lawsuit should employee poaching contin

It's not news that late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs approached former Palm CEO Ed Colligan to instate a no-poaching agreement between the two companies. And it's no secret that Colligan rebuffed the overture, stating in an email to Jobs that such an agreement was "likely illegal". As issue was Palm's active recruiting of then-current Apple employees; Apple had "gentlemen's deals" to squash cross-company recruitment with other Silicon Valley giants like Intel and Google. Even though Palm was small, under then-Chairman Job Rubinstein they were aggressively courting Apple employees to join the webOS project - this is back in August of 2007, over a year before webOS and the Palm Pre were unveiled to the world.

What we didn't know was that Jobs had threatened Palm with a patent lawsuit should they not stop attempting to poach employees. Said Colligan in an email response to Jobs: "This is a small space, and it's inevitable that we will bump into each other. Threatening Palm with a patent lawsuit in response to a decision by one employee to leave Apple is just out of line. A lawsuit would not serve either of our interests, and will not stop employees from migrating between our companies. This is a very exciting time for both of our companies, and the market is certainly big enough for both of us. We should focus on our respective businesses and not create unnecessary distractions."

And then, Colligan lays out a polite 'bring it on, Steve': "That said, I want to be clear that we are not intimidated by your threat. Palm has a very robust portfolio of patents, having been in the handheld and smartphone businesses since the early 90's… If you choose the litigation route, we can respond with our own claims based on these patent assests, but I don't think litigation is the answer. We will both just end up paying a lot of lawyers a lot of money."

To which Jobs responded, "I'm sure you must realize the asymmetry in the financial resources of our respective companies."

Source: Reuters; Scribd

read more...
Category:
6 years ago

Adjust Gesture Detection Method (LunaCE)

Adjust Gesture Detection Method (LunaCE)

by Adam Marks Wed, 23 Jan 2013 6:40 pm EST

This tip is only for HP TouchPads running webOS 3.0.5 and LunaCE 4.9.5 or higher

Tweaks - LunaCE Gesture DetectionWhen HP released their Open Source "webOS Community Edition" for the HP TouchPad (not to be confused with Open webOS), the group at WebOS Ports was able to package up those changes along with a bunch of enhancements and released it as LunaCE (pronounced lunacy") in Preware. LunaCE is currently in beta so you will need to go through the process to set-up the beta feeds in Preware, which can be found at testing.preware.org. In addition, you will need to have Tweaks installed on your TouchPad to toggle any of the new enhancements.

One enhancement that is available in LunaCE is the ability to adjust the Gesture Detection method when swiping in from the bottom of the screen (as long as you have Swipe up enabled on your device) to minimize your app. You have three options that you can choose from by opening up Tweaks and navigating to the Luna section

  • Swipe - You need to perform a fast swipe up from the bottom of the device and the gesture will be detected when you pull your finger up from the screen. If you perform a slow swipe up, nothing will happen.  This is the closest option to the stock webOS 3.0.5 experience
  • Slide - No matter how quickly or slowly you swipe up, you just need to swipe up 15 pixels from the bezel of the device. You do not need to even lift your finger from the screen, just swipe past that 15 pixel line and the gesture will activate
  • Fluid - This option provides the most natural option where the device actually tracks your finger and will show the transitional state of the app from active to being minimized. If you pick up your finger before the app is fully minimized, it will snap back to full screen

Regardless of your choice, LunaCE does provide one additional major improvement to the webOS experience. On a stock TouchPad, a swipe up from the bottom may minimize your app to card mode, but it will also interact with the app. So if you are reading a webpage it will scroll that page, if you have a drawing app up it may draw a line on your swipe, or if you are playing a game that swipe may cause an unanticipated action. In LunaCE, all swipes from the bezel of the device no longer affect the current app, which is a great thing!

6 years ago

WebOS Ports running wallpaper contest, make your photo the Ports default

WebOS Ports running wallpaper contest, make your photo the Ports default

by Derek Kessler Tue, 22 Jan 2013 5:53 pm EST

WebOS Ports running wallpaper contest, make your photo the Ports default

If you've done any tinkering around with the porting projects of webOS Ports, you've likely noticed the wallpaper they've been making use of. It's an image the sun rising over a foggy and rocky coastline. It's coloful. It's visually pleasing. It's nice. And it's time for it to go.

The fine folks at WebOS Ports have decided it's time to replace their choice for the wallpaper, and they want you to submit your images for consideration. Officially the contest is to include the wallpaper on the Galaxy Nexus port, though it's possible the wallpaper could find its way onto other WebOS Ports projects.

They're looking for images that are at least 1280px x 1280px (remember, Open webOS can rotate any which way), and of course it has to an image that isn't protected under copyright - i.e. something you've personally produced - and should not include the recognizable faces of people. Apart from that, it's a free-for-all.

Instructions on how to submit your image are at the source link below (time to learn how to IRC and how to Wiki), and submissions are open through the end of January. So go ahead, dig up that awesome image of yours and submit it. You never know, it might end up installing along with every Galaxy Nexus Open webOS port.
 

Source: WebOS Ports (Wiki, Twitter)

Category:
6 years ago

webOS Nation is all up in your socials, plussing up the Googles

webOS Nation is all up in your socials, plussing up the Googles

by Derek Kessler Mon, 21 Jan 2013 3:45 pm EST

webOS Nation is all up in your socials, plussing up the Googles

We know it's tough being a webOS fan sometimes. You're over on your favorite social network and everybody's got these new iPhones and Nexuses and Lumias and you've still got your Pre and TouchPad. Sure, you want new hardware just as much as the next guy, but it needs that special touch: webOS. Thankfully, the magic of social networks makes it easy to share your love of webOS, and now we're all over Google+ too.

That's right, peeps and peepettes, the latest news, reviews, editorials, and other simply amazing content of webOS Nation is now getting a thorough piping over to Google+. How does this magic happen? You can thank dlvr.it's brand-spanking-new support for the brand-spanking-new Google+ API. And a small amount of witchcraft.

If you're not already putting webOS Nation in your Google+ circles, now's your chance to do it and have it really matter. And, of course, we're still rocking away on Twitter, going to Facebook to like all of the things, and watching the occasional tumbleweed on App.net. All up in your socials, man.

Of course, there's more than just the glorious webOS Nation page on Google+, there are webOS Nation people on the network too. Feel free to draw us into your circles or whatever it is you do with Google+. No promises of activity from Derek (he's an antisocial hermit, ya'know), but everybody else is good for a plus or two.

6 years ago

Monday Brief: More BB10 leaks, The Galaxy Note 8.0, and more!

Monday Brief: More BB10 leaks, The Galaxy Note 8.0, and more!

by Ashley Esqueda Mon, 21 Jan 2013 10:57 am EST
Category:
6 years ago

Browse the web with stripped-down speed with wInNeR

Browse the web with stripped-down speed with wInNeR

by Derek Kessler Sun, 20 Jan 2013 6:14 pm EST

Browse the web with stripped-down speed with wInNeR

webOS homebrew developer 72ka - or as the humans say, Jan - has already left an indelible mark thanks to his highly functional and repeatedly improved Google Maps app. But he's not a one-trick pony, nor is he stuck in Mojo like the Google Maps app is. No, Jan can program in Enyo 2, and he's proving his chops with the newly-released wInNeR. The name might not make it immediately obvious what it is that wInNeR does, at least no until you break it down into its origin words, NASA-style: webOS Intelligent News Reader.

wInNeR serves as a stripped down web browser that does a lot of stripping down itself, and we're not talking about the kind of stripping that requires platform heels and a pole. No, wInNeR takes the websites you point it towards and strips away all of the formatting, shrinks down the images, and serves it up to you in a compact, easy-to-read format that focuses on the text content. By way of example, a graphics and formatting heavy website like the desktop version of the webOS Nation homepage, which weighs in at close to 3MB, is cut down to 900KB by wInNeR. Granted, the webOS Nation mobile site is far lighter than that, but it doesn't include any images on the main page to achieve that feat.

What makes wInNeR really unique is its use of caching; so long as you've got free RAM (which can be a hassle on webOS, we've learned over the years), wInNeR will cache up previously-visited pages, so going back not only doesn't require an additional load as the current crop of webOS browsers demand. So not only to you save precious KBs on your cellular connection, but you get to save that time you would have wasted waiting for a page you've already seen to redownload. That caching also saves your location on said page, dropping you right back where you were in an instant.

wInNeR's not perfect just yet - it is a first-release homebrew app, after all - but it's a novel idea with excellent execution. Heck, you can even tweak the text size so it works better on your little smartphone screen. As an Enyo 2 app, wInNeR includes the framework core, so you can install it on any webOS device, even that first-generation Pre or Pixi. No promises about performance, but our testing on a Pre3 revealed a lean and speedy app that does exactly what it promises. So fire up WebOS Quick Install or Preware and give wInNeR a go, you might be surprised.

Category:
Show More Headlines